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Advances in Food Science and Engineering
AFSE > Volume 3, Number 3, September 2019

Effect of the Roasting Conditions on the Secondary Metabolites, Phenolic Compounds and Antiradical Activity of Gabou

Download PDF  (324.5 KB)PP. 29-36,  Pub. Date:August 23, 2019
DOI: 10.22606/afse.2019.33001

Author(s)
Maman Moustapha RABIOU, Yaya Alain KOUDORO, Cokou Pascal AGABANGNAN DOSSA, Haoua SABO, Hassimi SADOU, Dominique C.K. SOHOUNHLOUE
Affiliation(s)
Laboratoire de Nutrition et de Valorisation des Agro ressources, Département de Chimie, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université Abdou Moumouni, BP 10662 Niamey, Niger.
Unité de réaction sur les Interactions Moléculaires (URIM), Laboratoire d’Etude et de Recherche en Chimie Appliquées (LERCA); Ecole Polytechnique d'Abomey-Calavi, Université d'Abomey-Calavi. 01 BP 2009 Cotonou, République du Bénin.
Unité de réaction sur les Interactions Moléculaires (URIM), Laboratoire d’Etude et de Recherche en Chimie Appliquées (LERCA); Ecole Polytechnique d'Abomey-Calavi, Université d'Abomey-Calavi. 01 BP 2009 Cotonou, République du Bénin.
Laboratoire de Nutrition et de Valorisation des Agro ressources, Département de Chimie, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université Abdou Moumouni, BP 10662 Niamey, Niger.
Laboratoire de Nutrition et de Valorisation des Agro ressources, Département de Chimie, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université Abdou Moumouni, BP 10662 Niamey, Niger.
Unité de réaction sur les Interactions Moléculaires (URIM), Laboratoire d’Etude et de Recherche en Chimie Appliquées (LERCA); Ecole Polytechnique d'Abomey-Calavi, Université d'Abomey-Calavi. 01 BP 2009 Cotonou, République du Bénin.
Abstract
Gabou is a traditional seasoning derived of onion commonly used in Niger. It is obtained by roasting the different organs of Allium cepa. The secondary metabolites, total phenolic content and antiradical activity of the different onion organs were determined and compared to those of their roasted products (Gabou). The results obtained showed the presence of flavonoids and reducing compounds in the samples analyzed. Depending on the type of Gabou, leucoanthocyanins, mucilages, saponosids, anthraquinons, sterols and terpens were detected or not detected. The levels of total phenols and total flavonoids ranged from 65.6 to 78.6 mg EAG/100g and 61.1 to 65.2 mg EQ/100g respectively. The antiradical activity ranged from 24.3 to 94.4 mg EAA/100g. Roasting caused a significant increase (p<0.05) in antiradical activity and a no significant increase (p>0.05) in total flavonoid and phenol levels.
Keywords
Gabou, Allium cepa, traditional seasoning, roasting, metabolites, phenolic compounds, antiradical activity
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